Review: ‘The Split’ by Sharon Bolton

The Split is an ambitious novel, not unlike a lot of Bolton’s other work. One of the things I enjoy most about her writing is that she never seems content to provide her readers with “just another thriller”. She explores territories and topics atypical to the genre, particularly in her standalone books, leaning into the curious and the unusual rather than shying away from it. Her protagonists are not the seasoned detectives or private investigators one might expect to populate the world of the fictional crime; they are herpetologists, nuns, true-crime authors, and – in this case – glaciologists.

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Review: ‘Missing Person’ by Sarah Lotz

Even if Sarah Lotz wasn’t one of my favourite authors, I would’ve found it difficult to talk myself out of buying her latest novel. I first fell in love with her writing in The Three – a twisty horror novel that mimics the style of “found footage” films like The Blair Witch Project. I impulse-bought The Four and The White Road without looking further than her name on the covers, and wasn’t disappointed with either. But when I found Missing Person just before the pandemic hit, I knew I was in trouble of losing touch with reality for a day or two. This one was going to need all my attention.

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Review: ‘A Walk at Midnight’ by Alex van Tonder

Jane Ronson is the epitome of a dutiful, devoted wife and mother. She has, with grit and grace, supported her husband, Colin, through the scandals and setbacks that have dogged his career as the Governor of New York State. After years in her restrictive role as the governor’s wife, Jane achieves her own success as […]

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Review: ‘The Girl Who Lived’ by Christopher Greyson

Sigh… Another book joins the ranks of “thrillers I absolutely adored until the last few chapters had to go and ruin the fun for everyone”. I was so sure that this was going to be a four- or five-star read that would bring me some semblance of joy in this virus-ridden hellscape. Alas.

In the interests of a fair discussion, I’ll put the ending aside for now. We can approach this book with the same attitude as a major news source outlining the background of a white school shooter – by focusing on (you guessed it!) its potential.

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Review: ‘Take Me To The Cat’ by Bryant A. Loney

One innocent reunion. One dark and deadly secret. And the truth that threatens them all. Nostalgic high school senior Michael Jackson wants nothing more than to reunite with his friends from elementary school—and possibly change his name. Transferring before middle school after his parents’ nasty divorce, Michael always felt he was at his happiest back […]

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